ICD-10

Successful implementation of ICD-10 should focus on REVIEW. What is ICD? Where did it come from? Who uses these code sets? What are the codes used for? When should the codes be used? Who is affected by the change? Successful implementation will require endocrinologists and their staff to REFRESH their basic and endocrine specific coding guidelines and conventions as well as the ICD-10-CM book formats and set up of other endocrine related codes. Capturing diagnosis codes at the highest level of specificity will require a REVISED approach to documentation. Each office must RENDER training to all staff at some level and be consistent and compliant with continuing education as these code sets continue to grow with new and advanced technology. Understanding the relevance and significance of consistently following guidelines and coding to the highest level of specificity through complete and concise documentation will result in REPORTING diagnosis that could ultimately improve patient care from a clinical and quality standpoint.

The current practice for physicians, coders, and billers is to use the ICD9-CM. Effective October 1, 2015, ICD10-CM will go into effect for all covered HIPAA entities.

Per CMS, “On December 7, 2011, CMS released a final rule updating payers' medical loss ratio to account for ICD-10 conversion costs. Effective January 3, 2012, the rule allows payers to switch some ICD-10 transition costs from the category of administrative costs to clinical costs, which will help payers cover transition costs. On January 16, 2009, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) released the final rule mandating that everyone covered by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) implement ICD-10 for medical coding. In a related final rule released the same day, HHS mandated that transaction standards for all electronic health care claims must be upgraded to Version 5010 from Version 4010/4010A by January 1, 2012. As of January 1, 2012 all HIPAA covered entities must be compliant with Version 5010. If you have not upgraded, there are resources available to assist you.” See http://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Coding/ICD10/Statute_Regulations.html

Date of orginal release: May 16, 2015

The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™.  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Provided by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists.

For questions regarding this CME activity, please contact the AACE CME Department through the Contact Us webform or cme@aace.com.

Copyright 2015, AACE. All rights reserved. No part of this enduring material may be reproduced or transmitted in any other form or by any other means, electronic or mechanical, without first obtaining written permission from AACE.

Target Audience

Physicians, Billers, Coders, Office Staff, Practice/Office Administrators, non-physician practitioners.

Learning Objectives

  • Explain the differences between ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM.
  • Review the benefits of ICD-10-CM.
  • Understand the implications and challenges endocrinology clinics face with ICD-10-CM.
Additional information
Available for MOC Points?: 
No
Practice Area: 
Coding/Practice Mgmt
Course summary
Available credit: 
  • 0.75 AMA
  • 0.75 Attendance
Course opens: 
08/03/2015
Course expires: 
08/03/2016
Cost:
$25.00

Todd W. Frieze, MD, FACP, FACE, ECNU, CCD, CEC; Katherine Ann Roberts, MD, FACE, ECNU

Available Credit

  • 0.75 AMA
  • 0.75 Attendance

Accreditation Period

Course opens: 
08/03/2015
Course expires: 
08/03/2016

Price

Cost:
$25.00
Please login or register to take this course.

Required Hardware/software

Users will need a computer with an internet connection, Internet Explorer 8.x or higher, the latest versions of Firefox, Safari, or Chrome, or any other W3C standards compliant browser, Adobe Flash Player and/or an HTML5 capable browser may be required for video or audio playback and occasionally other additional software may be required such as PowerPoint or Adobe Acrobat Reader.