Non-Insulin Injectable Therapies for Diabetes Management: New Options for Improved Outcomes

Original Presentation Captured on: May 18, 2018

An estimated 30.3 million Americans have type 2 diabetes (T2D), a complex, progressive disease that requires intensified treatment over time.1-3 The complexity of T2D management, coupled with the need to tailor treatment recommendations to individual patients, presents an ongoing clinical challenge. The number and variety of treatment options available for T2D has increased dramatically in the last 15 years, with several new drug classes emerging as safe and effective.2,4,5

In tandem with this, over the past decade, U.S. patient control of glucose and cardiovascular (CV) risk factors has improved, and rates of diabetes complications have decreased.6 Nevertheless, despite the increased range of treatment options for T2D, one-third to nearly one-half of all patients still do not meet treatment goals for glucose, blood pressure, or lipids, and only 14.3% meet goals for all three risk factors.7 Additionally, hypoglycemia is now also recognized as an underappreciated risk factor for morbidity and mortality in T2D.8

While increased pharmacotherapeutic choice has provided improved opportunities to individualize patient care, it has also led to more complex decision-making.2,9 With new treatments, it is now possible to individualize care to target each patient’s unique needs.2 Novel agents, including glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs), offer effective A1C lowering with a variety of agent-specific benefits, including weight loss and decreased CV risk.2,4,5,10 Results of recent CV outcomes trials have illuminated the potential for prescribing T2D therapies for benefits beyond glucose control, including CV risk reduction and potential renal benefits; recently, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved new indications for several agents related to decreased CV event risk.11,12

To best develop individualized disease management strategies, clinicians require ongoing education on available treatment options for T2D and the most recent and emerging clinical data on these pharmacotherapies. Thus, AACE proposes an educational program focused on new noninsulin injectable therapies. This program will provide physicians with the information they need to differentiate the risk: benefit profiles of newer noninsulin injectable therapies and to apply appropriate treatment strategies for patients with T2D, taking into consideration patient needs such as CV risk and renal function. This education will be provided at a live satellite symposium event, which will include interactive lectures with case studies and a collaborative “Ask an Endocrinologist” session wherein attendees are encouraged to discuss difficult cases.


 

NEEDS ASSESSMENT

Sources of Need

To identify healthcare performance gaps, barriers to closing these gaps, and educational needs for the target audience, the following approaches were utilized:

  • Searched and reviewed current relevant literature through evidence-based online articles
  • Current treatment guidelines for patients with T2D
  • U.S. Federal Government resources, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Available published literature on physician and other clinician needs as regards type 2 diabetes management
  • Expert physician interview

 

*This activity is provided by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists

*This program is supported by an independent educational grant from Novo Nordisk

Copyright 2018, AACE.  All rights reserved.  No part of this enduring material may be reproduced or transmitted in any other form or by any other means, electronic or mechanical, without first obtaining written permission from AACE.

Target Audience

Endocrinologists and other healthcare professionals involved in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D).

Learning Objectives

  1. Explain the role of GLP-1 RAs in T2D management and their mechanism(s) of action
  2. Discuss clinical study results regarding the CV outcomes associated GLP-1 RA use in patients with T2D
  3. Evaluate renal outcomes associated with GLP-1 RA use in patients with T2D
  4. Design effective T2D management strategies integrating GLP-1 RAs as dual or triple therapy, as appropriate, to meet individual patient needs
Additional information
AttachmentSize
Disclosure Information168.49 KB
Learner Bill of Rights76.13 KB
Available for MOC Points?: 
No
Practice Area: 
Diabetes
Course summary
Available credit: 
  • 1.75 AMA
  • 1.75 Attendance
Course opens: 
10/29/2018
Course expires: 
10/29/2019
Cost:
$0.00

Agenda

Welcome, Introduction and Pre-Test
Program Chair/Moderator: Daniel Einhorn, MD, FACP, FACE

Non-Insulin Injectable Therapies for Diabetes Management: GLP-1 Receptor Agonists
Vivian Fonseca, MD, FRCP, FACE

Objectives:
• Explain the role of GLP-1 RAs in T2D management and their mechanism(s) of action
• Design effective T2D management strategies integrating GLP-1 RAs as dual or triple therapy, as appropriate, to meet individual patient needs

GLP-1 Receptor Agonists and Cardiovascular Risk
Mikhail Kosiborod, MD, FACC, FAHA

Objectives:
• Discuss clinical study results regarding the CV outcomes associated GLP-1 RA use in patients with T2D
• Design effective T2D management strategies integrating GLP-1 RAs as dual or triple therapy, as appropriate, to meet individual patient needs

The Albuminuria Effect: GLP-1 RAs, the Kidneys, and Cardiovascular Outcomes Trials
Ralph DeFronzo, MD

Objectives:
• Evaluate renal outcomes associated with GLP-1 RA use in patients with T2D
• Design effective T2D management strategies integrating GLP-1 RAs as dual or triple therapy, as appropriate, to meet individual patient needs

Ask the Experts/Q&A

Post-Test

Chair and Moderator – Daniel Einhorn, MD, FACP, FACE

Medical Director, Scripps Whittier Diabetes Institute

Clinical Professor of Medicine, UCSD

Diabetes and Endocrine Associates

La Jolla, CA

 

Vivian Fonseca, MD, FRCP, FACE

Professor of Medicine and Pharmacology

Assistant Dean for Clinical Research

Tullis Tulane Alumni Chair in Diabetes

Chief, Section of Endocrinology

Tulane University Health Sciences Center

New Orleans, LA
 

Mikhail Kosiborod, MD, FACC, FAHA

Associate Director, Cardiovascular Research

Saint Luke’s Mid America Heart Institute

Professor of Medicine

University of Missouri-Kansas City

Kansas City, MO

 

Ralph A Defronzo, MD

Holder of the Joe R. & Teresa Lozano Long Dist. Chair in Diabetes

Professor of Medicine

Chief, Diabetes Division

UT Health San Antonio

San Antonio, TX


Disclosure and Resolutions of Conflicts of Interest

The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists remains strongly committed to providing the best available evidence-based clinical information to participants of this educational activity and requires an open disclosure of any potential conflict of interest identified by our faculty members. It is not the intent of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists to eliminate all situations of potential conflict of interest, but rather to enable those who are working with the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists to recognize situations that may be subject to question by others. All disclosed conflicts of interest are reviewed by the educational activity course director/chair to ensure that such situations are properly evaluated and, if necessary, resolved. The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists educational standards pertaining to conflict of interest are intended to maintain the professional autonomy of the clinical experts inherent in promoting a balanced presentation of science. Through our review process, all American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists CME activities are ensured of independent, objective, scientifically balanced presentations of information. Disclosure of any or no relationships will be made available for all educational activities. All faculty and planning committee members are required to disclose any financial relationships and will be listed accordingly within the "Disclosure Information" attachment. 


Disclaimer

The information provided at this CME activity is for continuing education purposes only and is not meant to substitute for the independent medical judgment of a health care provider relative to diagnostic and treatment options of a specific patient’s medical condition.

The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The American association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Available Credit

  • 1.75 AMA
  • 1.75 Attendance

Accreditation Period

Course opens: 
10/29/2018
Course expires: 
10/29/2019

Price

Cost:
$0.00
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